Black Scientists and Inventors

pretty_pixels no. 39, 10th of December 2011 batch

How an African slave helped Boston fight smallpox - The Boston Globe →

medievalpoc:

The idea behind this radical new treatment came from Africa, specifically from a slave named Onesimus, who shared his knowledge with Cotton Mather, the town’s leading minister and his legal owner. Boston still suffered dreadfully, but thanks to Onesimus and Mather, the terror linked to smallpox began to recede after Africans rolled up their sleeves—literally—to show Boston how inoculation worked. The story of how Boston began to overcome smallpox illustrates the strife that epidemics can cause, but also the encouraging notion that humans can communicate remedies as quickly as they communicate germs—and that the solutions we most need often come from the places we least expect to find them.

Mather had come close to choosing a career in medicine, and devoured the scientific publications of the Royal Society in London. As the society began to turn its attention to inoculation practices around the world, Mather realized that he had an extraordinary expert living in his household. Onesimus was a “pretty Intelligent Fellow,” it had become clear to him. When asked if he’d ever had smallpox, Onesimus answered “Yes and No,” explaining that he had been inoculated with a small amount of smallpox, which had left him immune to the disease. Fascinated, Mather asked for details, which Onesimus provided, and showed him his scar. We can almost hear Onesimus speaking in Mather’s accounts, for Mather took the unusual step of writing out his words with the African accent included—the key phrase was, “People take Juice of Small-Pox; and Cutty-skin, and Putt in a Drop.”

Excited, he investigated among other Africans in Boston and realized that it was a widespread practice; indeed, a slave could be expected to fetch a higher price with a scar on his arm, indicating that he was immune. Mather sent the Royal Society his own reports from the wilds of America, eager to prove the relevance of Boston (and by extension, Cotton Mather) to the global crusade against infectious disease. His interviews with Onesimus were crucial. In 1716, writing to an English friend, he promised that he would be ready to promote inoculation if smallpox ever visited the city again.

American History, but something I think a lot of people would be interested to read.

(via a-spoon-is-born)

— 18 hours ago with 1559 notes
unicef:

“Everyone is on their guard, including the medical personnel”
Dr. Elhadj Bah is a doctor at Donka Hospital, and has been serving in the Ebola treatment center since the outbreak of the disease. He is one of the few specialists on infectious disease in Guinea.
Q: Where were you when you first heard of Ebola?
A: I was at the hospital, working in the Infectious Diseases ward. 
Q: What were your first thoughts when you heard of the outbreak?
A: I was very surprised by the news, wondering where this could have been from. Knowing that there is no medicine, I was quite pessimistic at the beginning, thinking that we’re all doomed.
Q: What changes did you observe in the hospital in general?
A:  Hygiene measures are taken very seriously now. The use of bleach and chlorine has exponentially increased, and visitors were required to wash their hands before entering the hospital grounds. Everyone is on their guard, including the medical personnel. Many doctors even abandoned the hospital. At the onset, some doctors believed that this is a disease that had come to ravage the medical personnel so many doctors ‘scurried away’ and were nowhere to be seen for a long time. 
Q: Did Ebola change the day to day functioning of your work?
A:  Yes, it changed many things. The relationship between the doctors and the patients has changed a lot, people are much more careful. For instance, before the outbreak, the doctors would seldom wear protective gloves during examinations, and now it’s systematic. Additionally, we’ve received lots of attention as a result of this disease, and there were several interview requests. The collaboration with the partners has improved as well.

unicef:

“Everyone is on their guard, including the medical personnel”

Dr. Elhadj Bah is a doctor at Donka Hospital, and has been serving in the Ebola treatment center since the outbreak of the disease. He is one of the few specialists on infectious disease in Guinea.

Q: Where were you when you first heard of Ebola?

A: I was at the hospital, working in the Infectious Diseases ward.

Q: What were your first thoughts when you heard of the outbreak?

A: I was very surprised by the news, wondering where this could have been from. Knowing that there is no medicine, I was quite pessimistic at the beginning, thinking that we’re all doomed.

Q: What changes did you observe in the hospital in general?

A:  Hygiene measures are taken very seriously now. The use of bleach and chlorine has exponentially increased, and visitors were required to wash their hands before entering the hospital grounds. Everyone is on their guard, including the medical personnel. Many doctors even abandoned the hospital. At the onset, some doctors believed that this is a disease that had come to ravage the medical personnel so many doctors ‘scurried away’ and were nowhere to be seen for a long time.

Q: Did Ebola change the day to day functioning of your work?

A:  Yes, it changed many things. The relationship between the doctors and the patients has changed a lot, people are much more careful. For instance, before the outbreak, the doctors would seldom wear protective gloves during examinations, and now it’s systematic. Additionally, we’ve received lots of attention as a result of this disease, and there were several interview requests. The collaboration with the partners has improved as well.

(via talesofscienceandlove)

— 1 week ago with 111 notes
Woman saves three relatives from Ebola →

fluffmugger:

DUDE. SHE MANAGED TO GET A FUCKING 75% SURVIVAL RATE OUT OF A DISEASE WITH A 70% DEATH RATE.

(via thefemaletyrant)

— 2 weeks ago with 54378 notes
yungmethuselah:

ikazed:

youngblackandvegan:

black excellence

No, human excellence.

Let’s talk about set theory! In mathematical logic, we have a subfield called “set theory” where we study how items are collected into groups.
Providing a sort of logical bedrock, set theory informs foundational mathematics and computer science, among other fields, and continues to be a topic of mathematical research.
Sound too esoteric? Okay, you’re familiar with Venn diagrams, right? Venn diagrams are an example of basic set theory.

And you know how all squares are rectangles, but not all rectangles are squares? There we go, more set theory.
So, Black people are group within the larger group humans, i.e. all Black people are humans, BUT not all humans are Black people.
As you can see in the photograph above, Keven Stonewall, the Chicago teen who may cure colon cancer, is Black. Keven Stonewall’s membership in other groups such as humans, Chicagoans and teenagers occurs simultaneously; consider “Chicago teen.”
Why do we say “square” when we could say “rectangle”? Because “square” conveys useful information, including “rectangle”—as well as a refinement.
When we say Keven Stonewall is an example of Black excellence, we mean Keven Stonewall is an example of Black excellence.

yungmethuselah:

ikazed:

youngblackandvegan:

black excellence

No, human excellence.

Let’s talk about set theory! In mathematical logic, we have a subfield called “set theory” where we study how items are collected into groups.

Providing a sort of logical bedrock, set theory informs foundational mathematics and computer science, among other fields, and continues to be a topic of mathematical research.

Sound too esoteric? Okay, you’re familiar with Venn diagrams, right? Venn diagrams are an example of basic set theory.

image

And you know how all squares are rectangles, but not all rectangles are squares? There we go, more set theory.

So, Black people are group within the larger group humans, i.e. all Black people are humans, BUT not all humans are Black people.

As you can see in the photograph above, Keven Stonewall, the Chicago teen who may cure colon cancer, is Black. Keven Stonewall’s membership in other groups such as humans, Chicagoans and teenagers occurs simultaneously; consider “Chicago teen.”

Why do we say “square” when we could say “rectangle”? Because “square” conveys useful information, including “rectangle”—as well as a refinement.

When we say Keven Stonewall is an example of Black excellence, we mean Keven Stonewall is an example of Black excellence.

(Source: tsunamiwavesurfing, via freshmouthgoddess)

— 4 weeks ago with 113777 notes
baestheticsss:

thoughtsofablackgirl:

These handsome guys are from Meharry Medical College.
Here’s Some Facts About The School
Top-ten producer of African-American Ph.D.s in Biomedical Sciences
Leading producer of African-American dentists in U.S.
Meharry is the second largest educator of African-American medical doctors and dentists in the United States.
Meharry was the first medical school in the South for African Americans. 
Maharry is currently the largest private historically black institution (HBCU) in the United States dedicated to educating healthcare professionals and scientists.

This makes me so happy

baestheticsss:

thoughtsofablackgirl:

These handsome guys are from Meharry Medical College.

Here’s Some Facts About The School

Top-ten producer of African-American Ph.D.s in Biomedical Sciences

Leading producer of African-American dentists in U.S.

Meharry is the second largest educator of African-American medical doctors and dentists in the United States.

Meharry was the first medical school in the South for African Americans. 

Maharry is currently the largest private historically black institution (HBCU) in the United States dedicated to educating healthcare professionals and scientists.

This makes me so happy

(via mysoulhasgrowndeep-liketherivers)

— 4 weeks ago with 7564 notes
scienceyoucanlove:


Tony Hansberry II was a ninth-grader. The new sewing technique he has developed helps to to reduce the risk of complications and simplifies the hysterectomy procedure for less seasoned surgeons.His goal is to attend medical school and become a neurosurgeon. For Tony, it all began in school. He attends Darnell-Cookman School of the Medical Arts, a medical magnet school for middle and high schoolstudents. As part of its integrated medical curriculum, students receive medical instruction, but are also exposed to medical professionals who demonstrate advanced surgical techniques with specialized equipment. His lead medical teacher, Angela TenBroeck, told the Florida Times-Union that Hansberry is a typical student, but is way ahead of his classmates when it comes to surgical skills “I would put him up against a first year medical student. He is an outstanding young man,” she said.During his summer break, Tony volunteered at the University of Florida’s Center for Simulation Education and Safety Research (CSESaR) at Shands Jacksonville Hospital. He was supervised by Dr. Brent Siebel, a urogynecologist, and Bruce Nappi, the administrative director. Together they worked with Tony exploring the mannequins and simulation equipment that physicians and nurses use in training. He became quite interested in invasive surgery and using laparoscopic instruments. As the story goes, one day an obstetrics and gynecology professor asked the group to help him figure out why no one was using a particular surgical device, called an endostitch for hysterectomy suturing procedures. This long medical device has clamps on the end, but Tony used the instrument in a new way allowing for vertical suturing, instead of the traditional horizontal method. After two days, Tony had perfected and tested his new technique. He soon developed a science fair project comparing the suturing times of the vertical endostitch closures vs the horizontal closures using a conventional needle driver instrument.His results showed he was able to stitch three times faster using this new method. Use of this inventive technique may lead to shorter surgical times and improved patient treatment. Found on http://www.oshpd.ca.gov/

through 
Neurons want food

scienceyoucanlove:

Tony Hansberry II was a ninth-grader. The new sewing technique he has developed helps to to reduce the risk of complications and simplifies the hysterectomy procedure for less seasoned surgeons.

His goal is to attend medical school and become a neurosurgeon. For Tony, it all began in school. He attends Darnell-Cookman School of the Medical Arts, a medical magnet school for middle and high schoolstudents. As part of its integrated medical curriculum, students receive medical instruction, but are also exposed to medical professionals who demonstrate advanced surgical techniques with specialized equipment. His lead medical teacher, Angela TenBroeck, told the Florida Times-Union that Hansberry is a typical student, but is way ahead of his classmates when it comes to surgical skills “I would put him up against a first year medical student. He is an outstanding young man,” she said.

During his summer break, Tony volunteered at the University of Florida’s Center for Simulation Education and Safety Research (CSESaR) at Shands Jacksonville Hospital. He was supervised by Dr. Brent Siebel, a urogynecologist, and Bruce Nappi, the administrative director. Together they worked with Tony exploring the mannequins and simulation equipment that physicians and nurses use in training. He became quite interested in invasive surgery and using laparoscopic instruments. As the story goes, one day an obstetrics and gynecology professor asked the group to help him figure out why no one was using a particular surgical device, called an endostitch for hysterectomy suturing procedures. This long medical device has clamps on the end, but Tony used the instrument in a new way allowing for vertical suturing, instead of the traditional horizontal method. After two days, Tony had perfected and tested his new technique. He soon developed a science fair project comparing the suturing times of the vertical endostitch closures vs the horizontal closures using a conventional needle driver instrument.

His results showed he was able to stitch three times faster using this new method. Use of this inventive technique may lead to shorter surgical times and improved patient treatment. 

Found on http://www.oshpd.ca.gov/
through 

Neurons want food

— 1 month ago with 13083 notes
culturalandhistoricalvibes:

Walter S. McAfee is the African American mathematician and physicist who first calculated the speed of the moon. McAfee participated in Project Diana in the 1940s - a U.S. Army program, created to determine whether a high frequency radio signal could penetrate the earth’s outer atmosphere. To test this, scientists wanted to bounce a radar signal off the moon and back to earth. But the moon was a swiftly moving target, impossible to hit without knowing its exact speed. McAfee made the necessary calculations, and on January 10, 1946, the team sent a radar pulse through a special 40-feet square antenna towards the moon. Two and a half seconds later, they received a faint signal, proving that transmissions from earth could cross the vast distances of outer space. Official news of this scientific breakthrough did not include McAfee’s name, nor was there any recognition of the essential role he played. But Americans could not have walked on the moon had it not been for Walter S. McAfee and his calculations.
Click to see source:

culturalandhistoricalvibes:

Walter S. McAfee is the African American mathematician and physicist who first calculated the speed of the moon. McAfee participated in Project Diana in the 1940s - a U.S. Army program, created to determine whether a high frequency radio signal could penetrate the earth’s outer atmosphere. To test this, scientists wanted to bounce a radar signal off the moon and back to earth. But the moon was a swiftly moving target, impossible to hit without knowing its exact speed. McAfee made the necessary calculations, and on January 10, 1946, the team sent a radar pulse through a special 40-feet square antenna towards the moon. Two and a half seconds later, they received a faint signal, proving that transmissions from earth could cross the vast distances of outer space. Official news of this scientific breakthrough did not include McAfee’s name, nor was there any recognition of the essential role he played. But Americans could not have walked on the moon had it not been for Walter S. McAfee and his calculations.

Click to see source:

(via mysoulhasgrowndeep-liketherivers)

— 1 month ago with 5415 notes
bittergrapes:

lovelyandbrown:

daydreamsofarasta:

yungmethuselah:

ikazed:

youngblackandvegan:

black excellence

No, human excellence.

Let’s talk about set theory! In mathematical logic, we have a subfield called “set theory” where we study how items are collected into groups.
Providing a sort of logical bedrock, set theory informs foundational mathematics and computer science, among other fields, and continues to be a topic of mathematical research.
Sound too esoteric? Okay, you’re familiar with Venn diagrams, right? Venn diagrams are an example of basic set theory.

And you know how all squares are rectangles, but not all rectangles are squares? There we go, more set theory.
So, Black people are group within the larger group humans, i.e. all Black people are humans, BUT not all humans are Black people.
As you can see in the photograph above, Keven Stonewall, the Chicago teen who may cure colon cancer, is Black. Keven Stonewall’s membership in other groups such as humans, Chicagoans and teenagers occurs simultaneously; consider “Chicago teen.”
Why do we say “square” when we could say “rectangle”? Because “square” conveys useful information, including “rectangle”—as well as a refinement.
When we say Keven Stonewall is an example of Black excellence, we mean Keven Stonewall is an example of Black excellence.

👊👊👊

read DOWNNNNNE

Black excellence! And … Black Chicago excellence! Repping the South side, I’m so proud of him! Rush University is great!

bittergrapes:

lovelyandbrown:

daydreamsofarasta:

yungmethuselah:

ikazed:

youngblackandvegan:

black excellence

No, human excellence.

Let’s talk about set theory! In mathematical logic, we have a subfield called “set theory” where we study how items are collected into groups.

Providing a sort of logical bedrock, set theory informs foundational mathematics and computer science, among other fields, and continues to be a topic of mathematical research.

Sound too esoteric? Okay, you’re familiar with Venn diagrams, right? Venn diagrams are an example of basic set theory.

image

And you know how all squares are rectangles, but not all rectangles are squares? There we go, more set theory.

So, Black people are group within the larger group humans, i.e. all Black people are humans, BUT not all humans are Black people.

As you can see in the photograph above, Keven Stonewall, the Chicago teen who may cure colon cancer, is Black. Keven Stonewall’s membership in other groups such as humans, Chicagoans and teenagers occurs simultaneously; consider “Chicago teen.”

Why do we say “square” when we could say “rectangle”? Because “square” conveys useful information, including “rectangle”—as well as a refinement.

When we say Keven Stonewall is an example of Black excellence, we mean Keven Stonewall is an example of Black excellence.

👊👊👊

read DOWNNNNNE

Black excellence! And … Black Chicago excellence! Repping the South side, I’m so proud of him! Rush University is great!

(Source: tsunamiwavesurfing, via writersyndrome)

— 1 month ago with 113777 notes
prepaidafrica:

BBC News - How Africa’s first education tablet computer was created
Photo: Thierry N’Doufou’s education “tablet” is being introduced into schools this month
Two years ago, he came up with Qelasy, Africa’s first educational tablet. “We thought about how to build a digital backpack; a tablet that will replace books, textbooks, notepads.”
The idea is simple; transfer a country’s entire education curriculum onto a digital format, along with sounds, animations and interactivity, and you no longer need a satchel crammed with school books.
The 36-year-old teamed up with a designer and then managed to find an investor to build a prototype. This month his Qelasy tablet is going into schools for the first time.
“This is a day I’ve been waiting for,” Mr N’Doufou says.
The Ivorian government will be introducing the tablets to 5,000 students in public schools, while some private schools in both Ivory Coast and Morocco will be running pilot projects. They have also had interest from Ukraine, Macedonia, Senegal, Nigeria and France.
“My dream is to reach all the schools in the world for a better education,” he says.
The tablets will also be available in shops at a cost of $232 (£143), before tax.
'The brightest brains'
Qelasy’s headquarters in an upmarket area of Abidjan, Ivory Coast’s largest city, are not quite Google but they are certainly impressive. There is a built in sound studio along with a 3D animation design suite, complete with the latest technology.

prepaidafrica:

BBC News - How Africa’s first education tablet computer was created

Photo: Thierry N’Doufou’s education “tablet” is being introduced into schools this month

Two years ago, he came up with Qelasy, Africa’s first educational tablet. “We thought about how to build a digital backpack; a tablet that will replace books, textbooks, notepads.”

The idea is simple; transfer a country’s entire education curriculum onto a digital format, along with sounds, animations and interactivity, and you no longer need a satchel crammed with school books.

The 36-year-old teamed up with a designer and then managed to find an investor to build a prototype. This month his Qelasy tablet is going into schools for the first time.

“This is a day I’ve been waiting for,” Mr N’Doufou says.

The Ivorian government will be introducing the tablets to 5,000 students in public schools, while some private schools in both Ivory Coast and Morocco will be running pilot projects. They have also had interest from Ukraine, Macedonia, Senegal, Nigeria and France.

“My dream is to reach all the schools in the world for a better education,” he says.

The tablets will also be available in shops at a cost of $232 (£143), before tax.

'The brightest brains'

Qelasy’s headquarters in an upmarket area of Abidjan, Ivory Coast’s largest city, are not quite Google but they are certainly impressive. There is a built in sound studio along with a 3D animation design suite, complete with the latest technology.

— 1 month ago with 96 notes