Black Scientists and Inventors

pretty_pixels no. 39, 10th of December 2011 batch

setfabulazerstomaximumcaptain:

1shara:

african-secret-society:

soulbrotherv2:

For people who don’t have time to bathe or access to fresh water, a South African college student has a solution: a shower gel users simply rub onto their skin. One small packet replaces one bath, and users never need any water. Ludwick Marishane’s inspiration was a lazy friend, but his invention will be a boon to people who live in areas where clean water is in short supply. 
The gel, called Drybath, kills germs, moisturizes the skin and exudes a pleasant, light smell, unlike hand sanitizers, according to Marishane’s website, Headboy Industries.  [Continue reading.]
Image via Science History and Facts.

love this

Necessity is the mother of invention.

And why hasn’t this blown up yet?
oh
oh yeah

setfabulazerstomaximumcaptain:

1shara:

african-secret-society:

soulbrotherv2:

For people who don’t have time to bathe or access to fresh water, a South African college student has a solution: a shower gel users simply rub onto their skin. One small packet replaces one bath, and users never need any water. Ludwick Marishane’s inspiration was a lazy friend, but his invention will be a boon to people who live in areas where clean water is in short supply. 

The gel, called Drybath, kills germs, moisturizes the skin and exudes a pleasant, light smell, unlike hand sanitizers, according to Marishane’s website, Headboy Industries.  [Continue reading.]

Image via Science History and Facts.

love this

Necessity is the mother of invention.

And why hasn’t this blown up yet?

oh

oh yeah

(via kyleandmaxinesdaughter)

— 1 month ago with 200395 notes
cenwatchglass:

Black Women, Chemistry PioneersAfrican American women staked out careers in chemistry despite racial and gender discriminationReviewed by Sharon L. Neal
When Chemical & Engineering News asked me to write a review of “African American Women Chemists,” by Jeannette E. Brown, I qualified my acceptance: “I am biased; I want to like it,” not only because I have a vested interest in the subject matter, but because I can’t imagine how difficult it must have been to bring this project to fruition.
It has been several years since I first met Brown—a retired Merck & Co. research chemist and the 2009 Glenn E. & Barbara Hodson Ullyot Scholar of the Chemical Heritage Foundation—and learned of her intention to write a book recounting the life stories of the first African American women chemists. Whenever I would see her at American Chemical Society meetings, she would mention this work and I would nod and smile.
Now I worry that while I tried to look encouraging, my skepticism about her ability to complete such a book poked through. I was skeptical not only because of the small number of African American women chemistry pioneers, but also because I doubted that their lives were sufficiently documented to support a book. I could name a few African American men who had earned Ph.D.s in chemistry and had careers of distinction before affirmative action—Percy Julian, Lloyd Ferguson, and Samuel Massie, for instance—but I couldn’t name any black women in chemistry from that time, distinguished or otherwise. As I smiled I was thinking, “A whole book on this topic is impossible. What source material can there be?”
The last time I saw Brown, she was clearly dealing with health challenges and using a scooter to get around at the ACS meeting. I was more convinced her book would remain unwritten. I should have known better, though. How could writing a book about African American women chemists be more impossible than the accomplishments that the book recounts? I should have realized that Brown’s determination to write the book taps the same well that helped drive her subjects to pursue success in science.
Keep reading: Chemical & Engineering News, April 2, 2012

cenwatchglass:

Black Women, Chemistry Pioneers
African American women staked out careers in chemistry despite racial and gender discrimination
Reviewed by Sharon L. Neal

When Chemical & Engineering News asked me to write a review of “African American Women Chemists,” by Jeannette E. Brown, I qualified my acceptance: “I am biased; I want to like it,” not only because I have a vested interest in the subject matter, but because I can’t imagine how difficult it must have been to bring this project to fruition.

It has been several years since I first met Brown—a retired Merck & Co. research chemist and the 2009 Glenn E. & Barbara Hodson Ullyot Scholar of the Chemical Heritage Foundation—and learned of her intention to write a book recounting the life stories of the first African American women chemists. Whenever I would see her at American Chemical Society meetings, she would mention this work and I would nod and smile.

Now I worry that while I tried to look encouraging, my skepticism about her ability to complete such a book poked through. I was skeptical not only because of the small number of African American women chemistry pioneers, but also because I doubted that their lives were sufficiently documented to support a book. I could name a few African American men who had earned Ph.D.s in chemistry and had careers of distinction before affirmative action—Percy Julian, Lloyd Ferguson, and Samuel Massie, for instance—but I couldn’t name any black women in chemistry from that time, distinguished or otherwise. As I smiled I was thinking, “A whole book on this topic is impossible. What source material can there be?”

The last time I saw Brown, she was clearly dealing with health challenges and using a scooter to get around at the ACS meeting. I was more convinced her book would remain unwritten. I should have known better, though. How could writing a book about African American women chemists be more impossible than the accomplishments that the book recounts? I should have realized that Brown’s determination to write the book taps the same well that helped drive her subjects to pursue success in science.

Keep reading: Chemical & Engineering News, April 2, 2012

(via vcuafam)

— 1 month ago with 249 notes
Neil deGrasse Tyson's Mom Explains How to Raise a Brilliant Child →

wrcsolace:

Fav Black momma thing from the article:

“All three of my children are brown, and they stay brown all year round, and they even get darker in the summertime.”

— 2 months ago with 313 notes
talesofscienceandlove:

Amanda Spann and Kat Calvin, CMO and CEO, Blerdology
#18 on Business Insider’s 30 Most Important Women Under 30 in Tech list
About Spann: Amanda Spann has played an instrumental role in the formation of Blerdology, a social enterprise dedicated to increasing the number of African-Americans in tech. Blerdology, formerly known as Black Girls Hack, is the company behind the signature hackathon series #BlackHack. 
In addition to her media and marketing work at Blerdology, Spann is also the founder at Brandspan Consulting, and interactive PR and branding firm. The entrepreneur and media strategist has worked for and with big-name companies including Atlantic Records, Sean John, and Ciroc, and startups including Mobli and Hinge. 
About Calvin: Kat Calvin is a serial entrepreneur with a background in law. Her company, Blerdology produced the country’s first all black female hackathon last year, and continues to host events throughout the country to help African-Americans become fluent in computer programming.
Calvin’s other startup, Character’s Closet, helps fans find and purchase outfits they see on TV and in movies. 

talesofscienceandlove:

Amanda Spann and Kat Calvin, CMO and CEO, Blerdology

#18 on Business Insider’s 30 Most Important Women Under 30 in Tech list

About Spann: Amanda Spann has played an instrumental role in the formation of Blerdology, a social enterprise dedicated to increasing the number of African-Americans in tech. Blerdology, formerly known as Black Girls Hack, is the company behind the signature hackathon series #BlackHack. 

In addition to her media and marketing work at Blerdology, Spann is also the founder at Brandspan Consulting, and interactive PR and branding firm. The entrepreneur and media strategist has worked for and with big-name companies including Atlantic Records, Sean John, and Ciroc, and startups including Mobli and Hinge. 

About Calvin: Kat Calvin is a serial entrepreneur with a background in law. Her company, Blerdology produced the country’s first all black female hackathon last year, and continues to host events throughout the country to help African-Americans become fluent in computer programming.

Calvin’s other startup, Character’s Closet, helps fans find and purchase outfits they see on TV and in movies. 

(via strugglingtobeheard)

— 2 months ago with 379 notes
womeninspace:

Mae Jemison getting her flightsuit tested by Sharon McDougle. The suits need to be tested to make sure that there are no leaks, specially after they have been transported. To make accurate readings the astronaut has to hold her breath for a while.
Source: NASA JSC Oral History / Image

womeninspace:

Mae Jemison getting her flightsuit tested by Sharon McDougle. The suits need to be tested to make sure that there are no leaks, specially after they have been transported. To make accurate readings the astronaut has to hold her breath for a while.

Source: NASA JSC Oral History / Image

— 2 months ago with 223 notes
Sexiest Black Female Scientists by Kyla McMullen →

On February 25, 2013, Business Insider created an article showcasing The Sexiest Scientists Alive! (as of 6/14/14, there is no 2014 list).
As I scrolled through the article, much to my chagrin, I observed that out of 50 scientists, there were no Black women listed. This would lead the reader to believe that either: 

a) There are no Black women who are scientists
OR
b) The Black women who are scientists are not good looking


Despite the magazine’s intentional or unintentional exclusion, the purpose of this article is to increase the visibility of Black female scientists and show the world that we do exist.
Being omitted in the Business Insider adds to the constant feelings of invisibility and isolation that are felt by many women of color in STEM fields. Furthermore, if I were a young Black girl looking at the Business Insider Article, I would unconsciously be receiving the not-so-subtle message that people who look like me do not excel in science. So why would I try a scientific career? *** The face of Science needs an extreme makeover. If the current generation is going to be engaged in scientific careers, we need to dispel the stereotypical image of a scientist as being a white, glasses wearing, socially-inept nerd. The Business Insiders went one step in this direction, but not far enough. This generation needs to see that being a scientist is not a death sentence to a life of awkwardness.

So… the next time any entity feels compelled to make a list of scientists (portraying any attribute), here is a reference so that you can include some incredible sistas in the mix. All of the people featured in this article are people that I actually know or have at most one degree of separation. If we left your favorite scientist off the list, leave us a comment with their name below, and perhaps there will be a part 2. Without further ado, (in no particular order, despite the fact that there are numbers :) here are 73 fabulous Black women who are scientists (starting with myself): - See more at: AMORE

— 2 months ago with 24 notes
#Black Women Scientists 

cenwatchglass:

In a rare philatelic tribute to a scientist, a new 29-cent U.S. stamp commemorates the late black chemist Percy Lavon Julian. The stamp, released for nationwide sale on Jan. 30, puts Julian in the company of W. E. B. Du Bois, Sojourner Truth, Jackie Robinson, Martin Luther King Jr., and others honored in the U.S. Postal Service’s black heritage commemorative series.

Julian’s story is one of a grandson of slaves who overcame prejudice, blatant job discrimination, and two bombings of his home to become a pioneer in the chemical synthesis of medicinal drugs, an industrial research manager—and eventually a millionaire entrepreneur.

"He was the first black research director of any chemical concern of note," says emeritus chemistry professor Donald J. Cook of DePauw University, Greencastle, Ind., Julian’s alma mater. "In fact, I would call him the first black research chemist that America turned out."

Among Julian’s most significant scientific accomplishments were the first total synthesis of the glaucoma drug physostigmine, the discovery of an economical way to produce sex hormones from soybean oil, and the development of a low-cost synthetic method for making a form of the antiarthritis drug cortisone.

-Stu Borman

Black Chemist Percy Julian Commemorated on Postage Stamp: Julian overcame prejudice, discrimination, and violence to become first major black research chemist in U.S. and millionaire entrepreneur

Chemical & Engineering News, February 1, 1993

— 2 months ago with 647 notes
untouchmyhair:

mikal-xavier:

untouchmyhair:

Put some black pride on your feed and follow @augustxxviii on IG for daily black history moments

shit give me some time to put it in a sci-fi book at a least gosh slow down!

lls

untouchmyhair:

mikal-xavier:

untouchmyhair:

Put some black pride on your feed and follow @augustxxviii on IG for daily black history moments

shit give me some time to put it in a sci-fi book at a least gosh slow down!

lls

(via thevictoriaa)

— 2 months ago with 202561 notes

nintendo-kid:

gailsimone:

burekevan:

Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson on the defunding of NASA.

Wow. Fantastic.

Its so true though 

(via blackfemalescientist)

— 2 months ago with 87997 notes