Black Scientists and Inventors

pretty_pixels no. 39, 10th of December 2011 batch

scienceyoucanlove:


Tony Hansberry II was a ninth-grader. The new sewing technique he has developed helps to to reduce the risk of complications and simplifies the hysterectomy procedure for less seasoned surgeons.His goal is to attend medical school and become a neurosurgeon. For Tony, it all began in school. He attends Darnell-Cookman School of the Medical Arts, a medical magnet school for middle and high schoolstudents. As part of its integrated medical curriculum, students receive medical instruction, but are also exposed to medical professionals who demonstrate advanced surgical techniques with specialized equipment. His lead medical teacher, Angela TenBroeck, told the Florida Times-Union that Hansberry is a typical student, but is way ahead of his classmates when it comes to surgical skills “I would put him up against a first year medical student. He is an outstanding young man,” she said.During his summer break, Tony volunteered at the University of Florida’s Center for Simulation Education and Safety Research (CSESaR) at Shands Jacksonville Hospital. He was supervised by Dr. Brent Siebel, a urogynecologist, and Bruce Nappi, the administrative director. Together they worked with Tony exploring the mannequins and simulation equipment that physicians and nurses use in training. He became quite interested in invasive surgery and using laparoscopic instruments. As the story goes, one day an obstetrics and gynecology professor asked the group to help him figure out why no one was using a particular surgical device, called an endostitch for hysterectomy suturing procedures. This long medical device has clamps on the end, but Tony used the instrument in a new way allowing for vertical suturing, instead of the traditional horizontal method. After two days, Tony had perfected and tested his new technique. He soon developed a science fair project comparing the suturing times of the vertical endostitch closures vs the horizontal closures using a conventional needle driver instrument.His results showed he was able to stitch three times faster using this new method. Use of this inventive technique may lead to shorter surgical times and improved patient treatment. Found on http://www.oshpd.ca.gov/

through 
Neurons want food

scienceyoucanlove:

Tony Hansberry II was a ninth-grader. The new sewing technique he has developed helps to to reduce the risk of complications and simplifies the hysterectomy procedure for less seasoned surgeons.

His goal is to attend medical school and become a neurosurgeon. For Tony, it all began in school. He attends Darnell-Cookman School of the Medical Arts, a medical magnet school for middle and high schoolstudents. As part of its integrated medical curriculum, students receive medical instruction, but are also exposed to medical professionals who demonstrate advanced surgical techniques with specialized equipment. His lead medical teacher, Angela TenBroeck, told the Florida Times-Union that Hansberry is a typical student, but is way ahead of his classmates when it comes to surgical skills “I would put him up against a first year medical student. He is an outstanding young man,” she said.

During his summer break, Tony volunteered at the University of Florida’s Center for Simulation Education and Safety Research (CSESaR) at Shands Jacksonville Hospital. He was supervised by Dr. Brent Siebel, a urogynecologist, and Bruce Nappi, the administrative director. Together they worked with Tony exploring the mannequins and simulation equipment that physicians and nurses use in training. He became quite interested in invasive surgery and using laparoscopic instruments. As the story goes, one day an obstetrics and gynecology professor asked the group to help him figure out why no one was using a particular surgical device, called an endostitch for hysterectomy suturing procedures. This long medical device has clamps on the end, but Tony used the instrument in a new way allowing for vertical suturing, instead of the traditional horizontal method. After two days, Tony had perfected and tested his new technique. He soon developed a science fair project comparing the suturing times of the vertical endostitch closures vs the horizontal closures using a conventional needle driver instrument.

His results showed he was able to stitch three times faster using this new method. Use of this inventive technique may lead to shorter surgical times and improved patient treatment. 

Found on http://www.oshpd.ca.gov/
through 

Neurons want food

— 3 days ago with 5671 notes
culturalandhistoricalvibes:

Walter S. McAfee is the African American mathematician and physicist who first calculated the speed of the moon. McAfee participated in Project Diana in the 1940s - a U.S. Army program, created to determine whether a high frequency radio signal could penetrate the earth’s outer atmosphere. To test this, scientists wanted to bounce a radar signal off the moon and back to earth. But the moon was a swiftly moving target, impossible to hit without knowing its exact speed. McAfee made the necessary calculations, and on January 10, 1946, the team sent a radar pulse through a special 40-feet square antenna towards the moon. Two and a half seconds later, they received a faint signal, proving that transmissions from earth could cross the vast distances of outer space. Official news of this scientific breakthrough did not include McAfee’s name, nor was there any recognition of the essential role he played. But Americans could not have walked on the moon had it not been for Walter S. McAfee and his calculations.
Click to see source:

culturalandhistoricalvibes:

Walter S. McAfee is the African American mathematician and physicist who first calculated the speed of the moon. McAfee participated in Project Diana in the 1940s - a U.S. Army program, created to determine whether a high frequency radio signal could penetrate the earth’s outer atmosphere. To test this, scientists wanted to bounce a radar signal off the moon and back to earth. But the moon was a swiftly moving target, impossible to hit without knowing its exact speed. McAfee made the necessary calculations, and on January 10, 1946, the team sent a radar pulse through a special 40-feet square antenna towards the moon. Two and a half seconds later, they received a faint signal, proving that transmissions from earth could cross the vast distances of outer space. Official news of this scientific breakthrough did not include McAfee’s name, nor was there any recognition of the essential role he played. But Americans could not have walked on the moon had it not been for Walter S. McAfee and his calculations.

Click to see source:

(via mysoulhasgrowndeep-liketherivers)

— 4 days ago with 4088 notes
bittergrapes:

lovelyandbrown:

daydreamsofarasta:

yungmethuselah:

ikazed:

youngblackandvegan:

black excellence

No, human excellence.

Let’s talk about set theory! In mathematical logic, we have a subfield called “set theory” where we study how items are collected into groups.
Providing a sort of logical bedrock, set theory informs foundational mathematics and computer science, among other fields, and continues to be a topic of mathematical research.
Sound too esoteric? Okay, you’re familiar with Venn diagrams, right? Venn diagrams are an example of basic set theory.

And you know how all squares are rectangles, but not all rectangles are squares? There we go, more set theory.
So, Black people are group within the larger group humans, i.e. all Black people are humans, BUT not all humans are Black people.
As you can see in the photograph above, Keven Stonewall, the Chicago teen who may cure colon cancer, is Black. Keven Stonewall’s membership in other groups such as humans, Chicagoans and teenagers occurs simultaneously; consider “Chicago teen.”
Why do we say “square” when we could say “rectangle”? Because “square” conveys useful information, including “rectangle”—as well as a refinement.
When we say Keven Stonewall is an example of Black excellence, we mean Keven Stonewall is an example of Black excellence.

👊👊👊

read DOWNNNNNE

Black excellence! And … Black Chicago excellence! Repping the South side, I’m so proud of him! Rush University is great!

bittergrapes:

lovelyandbrown:

daydreamsofarasta:

yungmethuselah:

ikazed:

youngblackandvegan:

black excellence

No, human excellence.

Let’s talk about set theory! In mathematical logic, we have a subfield called “set theory” where we study how items are collected into groups.

Providing a sort of logical bedrock, set theory informs foundational mathematics and computer science, among other fields, and continues to be a topic of mathematical research.

Sound too esoteric? Okay, you’re familiar with Venn diagrams, right? Venn diagrams are an example of basic set theory.

image

And you know how all squares are rectangles, but not all rectangles are squares? There we go, more set theory.

So, Black people are group within the larger group humans, i.e. all Black people are humans, BUT not all humans are Black people.

As you can see in the photograph above, Keven Stonewall, the Chicago teen who may cure colon cancer, is Black. Keven Stonewall’s membership in other groups such as humans, Chicagoans and teenagers occurs simultaneously; consider “Chicago teen.”

Why do we say “square” when we could say “rectangle”? Because “square” conveys useful information, including “rectangle”—as well as a refinement.

When we say Keven Stonewall is an example of Black excellence, we mean Keven Stonewall is an example of Black excellence.

👊👊👊

read DOWNNNNNE

Black excellence! And … Black Chicago excellence! Repping the South side, I’m so proud of him! Rush University is great!

(Source: tsunamiwavesurfing, via writersyndrome)

— 4 days ago with 90074 notes
prepaidafrica:

BBC News - How Africa’s first education tablet computer was created
Photo: Thierry N’Doufou’s education “tablet” is being introduced into schools this month
Two years ago, he came up with Qelasy, Africa’s first educational tablet. “We thought about how to build a digital backpack; a tablet that will replace books, textbooks, notepads.”
The idea is simple; transfer a country’s entire education curriculum onto a digital format, along with sounds, animations and interactivity, and you no longer need a satchel crammed with school books.
The 36-year-old teamed up with a designer and then managed to find an investor to build a prototype. This month his Qelasy tablet is going into schools for the first time.
“This is a day I’ve been waiting for,” Mr N’Doufou says.
The Ivorian government will be introducing the tablets to 5,000 students in public schools, while some private schools in both Ivory Coast and Morocco will be running pilot projects. They have also had interest from Ukraine, Macedonia, Senegal, Nigeria and France.
“My dream is to reach all the schools in the world for a better education,” he says.
The tablets will also be available in shops at a cost of $232 (£143), before tax.
'The brightest brains'
Qelasy’s headquarters in an upmarket area of Abidjan, Ivory Coast’s largest city, are not quite Google but they are certainly impressive. There is a built in sound studio along with a 3D animation design suite, complete with the latest technology.

prepaidafrica:

BBC News - How Africa’s first education tablet computer was created

Photo: Thierry N’Doufou’s education “tablet” is being introduced into schools this month

Two years ago, he came up with Qelasy, Africa’s first educational tablet. “We thought about how to build a digital backpack; a tablet that will replace books, textbooks, notepads.”

The idea is simple; transfer a country’s entire education curriculum onto a digital format, along with sounds, animations and interactivity, and you no longer need a satchel crammed with school books.

The 36-year-old teamed up with a designer and then managed to find an investor to build a prototype. This month his Qelasy tablet is going into schools for the first time.

“This is a day I’ve been waiting for,” Mr N’Doufou says.

The Ivorian government will be introducing the tablets to 5,000 students in public schools, while some private schools in both Ivory Coast and Morocco will be running pilot projects. They have also had interest from Ukraine, Macedonia, Senegal, Nigeria and France.

“My dream is to reach all the schools in the world for a better education,” he says.

The tablets will also be available in shops at a cost of $232 (£143), before tax.

'The brightest brains'

Qelasy’s headquarters in an upmarket area of Abidjan, Ivory Coast’s largest city, are not quite Google but they are certainly impressive. There is a built in sound studio along with a 3D animation design suite, complete with the latest technology.

— 4 days ago with 95 notes
brownglucose:

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts, Follow Ultrafacts

BLACK EXCELLENCE! BLACK WOMEN IN SCIENCE! YESSSSSSS!!!!!

brownglucose:

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts, Follow Ultrafacts

BLACK EXCELLENCE! BLACK WOMEN IN SCIENCE! YESSSSSSS!!!!!

(via talesofscienceandlove)

— 1 week ago with 42892 notes
mynameisentirelyigbo:

johnthelutheran:

rhube:

jenniferrpovey:

jumpingjacktrash:

becausegoodheroesdeservekidneys:

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts

YOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
Senegal, Mauritania, Mali, Burkina Faso, Niger, Nigeria, Chad, Sudan, Eritrea, Ethiopia, and Djibouti. Those are the countries. It will be drought-resistant species, mostly acacias. And this is a fucking brilliant idea you have no idea oh my Christ
This will create so many jobs and regenerate so many communities and aaaaaahhhhhhh

more info here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Green_Wall
it’s already happening, and already having positive effects. this is wonderful, why have i not heard of this before? i’m so happy!

Oh yes, acacia trees.
They fix nitrogen and improve soil quality.
And, to make things fun, the species they’re using practices “reverse leaf phenology.” The trees go dormant in the rainy season and then grow their leaves again in the dry season. This means you can plant crops under the trees, in that nitrogen-rich soil, and the trees don’t compete for light because they don’t have any leaves on.
And then in the dry season, you harvest the leaves and feed them to your cows.
Crops grown under acacia trees have better yield than those grown without them. Considerably better.
So, this isn’t just about stopping the advancement of the Sahara - it’s also about improving food security for the entire sub-Saharan belt and possibly reclaiming some of the desert as productive land.
Of course, before the “green revolution,” the farmers knew to plant acacia trees - it’s a traditional practice that they were convinced to abandon in favor of “more reliable” artificial fertilizers (that caused soil degradation, soil erosion, etc).
This is why you listen to the people who, you know, have lived with and on land for centuries.

Fantastic.

The Great Green Wall, to resist the encroachment of the Sahara. Fascinating.

I’m so proud of my people.

mynameisentirelyigbo:

johnthelutheran:

rhube:

jenniferrpovey:

jumpingjacktrash:

becausegoodheroesdeservekidneys:

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts

YOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

Senegal, Mauritania, Mali, Burkina Faso, Niger, Nigeria, Chad, Sudan, Eritrea, Ethiopia, and Djibouti. Those are the countries. It will be drought-resistant species, mostly acacias. And this is a fucking brilliant idea you have no idea oh my Christ

This will create so many jobs and regenerate so many communities and aaaaaahhhhhhh

more info here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Green_Wall

it’s already happening, and already having positive effects. this is wonderful, why have i not heard of this before? i’m so happy!

Oh yes, acacia trees.

They fix nitrogen and improve soil quality.

And, to make things fun, the species they’re using practices “reverse leaf phenology.” The trees go dormant in the rainy season and then grow their leaves again in the dry season. This means you can plant crops under the trees, in that nitrogen-rich soil, and the trees don’t compete for light because they don’t have any leaves on.

And then in the dry season, you harvest the leaves and feed them to your cows.

Crops grown under acacia trees have better yield than those grown without them. Considerably better.

So, this isn’t just about stopping the advancement of the Sahara - it’s also about improving food security for the entire sub-Saharan belt and possibly reclaiming some of the desert as productive land.

Of course, before the “green revolution,” the farmers knew to plant acacia trees - it’s a traditional practice that they were convinced to abandon in favor of “more reliable” artificial fertilizers (that caused soil degradation, soil erosion, etc).

This is why you listen to the people who, you know, have lived with and on land for centuries.

Fantastic.

The Great Green Wall, to resist the encroachment of the Sahara. Fascinating.

I’m so proud of my people.

(via notime4yourshit)

— 1 week ago with 100254 notes
setfabulazerstomaximumcaptain:

1shara:

african-secret-society:

soulbrotherv2:

For people who don’t have time to bathe or access to fresh water, a South African college student has a solution: a shower gel users simply rub onto their skin. One small packet replaces one bath, and users never need any water. Ludwick Marishane’s inspiration was a lazy friend, but his invention will be a boon to people who live in areas where clean water is in short supply. 
The gel, called Drybath, kills germs, moisturizes the skin and exudes a pleasant, light smell, unlike hand sanitizers, according to Marishane’s website, Headboy Industries.  [Continue reading.]
Image via Science History and Facts.

love this

Necessity is the mother of invention.

And why hasn’t this blown up yet?
oh
oh yeah

setfabulazerstomaximumcaptain:

1shara:

african-secret-society:

soulbrotherv2:

For people who don’t have time to bathe or access to fresh water, a South African college student has a solution: a shower gel users simply rub onto their skin. One small packet replaces one bath, and users never need any water. Ludwick Marishane’s inspiration was a lazy friend, but his invention will be a boon to people who live in areas where clean water is in short supply. 

The gel, called Drybath, kills germs, moisturizes the skin and exudes a pleasant, light smell, unlike hand sanitizers, according to Marishane’s website, Headboy Industries.  [Continue reading.]

Image via Science History and Facts.

love this

Necessity is the mother of invention.

And why hasn’t this blown up yet?

oh

oh yeah

(via kyleandmaxinesdaughter)

— 2 months ago with 226061 notes
cenwatchglass:

Black Women, Chemistry PioneersAfrican American women staked out careers in chemistry despite racial and gender discriminationReviewed by Sharon L. Neal
When Chemical & Engineering News asked me to write a review of “African American Women Chemists,” by Jeannette E. Brown, I qualified my acceptance: “I am biased; I want to like it,” not only because I have a vested interest in the subject matter, but because I can’t imagine how difficult it must have been to bring this project to fruition.
It has been several years since I first met Brown—a retired Merck & Co. research chemist and the 2009 Glenn E. & Barbara Hodson Ullyot Scholar of the Chemical Heritage Foundation—and learned of her intention to write a book recounting the life stories of the first African American women chemists. Whenever I would see her at American Chemical Society meetings, she would mention this work and I would nod and smile.
Now I worry that while I tried to look encouraging, my skepticism about her ability to complete such a book poked through. I was skeptical not only because of the small number of African American women chemistry pioneers, but also because I doubted that their lives were sufficiently documented to support a book. I could name a few African American men who had earned Ph.D.s in chemistry and had careers of distinction before affirmative action—Percy Julian, Lloyd Ferguson, and Samuel Massie, for instance—but I couldn’t name any black women in chemistry from that time, distinguished or otherwise. As I smiled I was thinking, “A whole book on this topic is impossible. What source material can there be?”
The last time I saw Brown, she was clearly dealing with health challenges and using a scooter to get around at the ACS meeting. I was more convinced her book would remain unwritten. I should have known better, though. How could writing a book about African American women chemists be more impossible than the accomplishments that the book recounts? I should have realized that Brown’s determination to write the book taps the same well that helped drive her subjects to pursue success in science.
Keep reading: Chemical & Engineering News, April 2, 2012

cenwatchglass:

Black Women, Chemistry Pioneers
African American women staked out careers in chemistry despite racial and gender discrimination
Reviewed by Sharon L. Neal

When Chemical & Engineering News asked me to write a review of “African American Women Chemists,” by Jeannette E. Brown, I qualified my acceptance: “I am biased; I want to like it,” not only because I have a vested interest in the subject matter, but because I can’t imagine how difficult it must have been to bring this project to fruition.

It has been several years since I first met Brown—a retired Merck & Co. research chemist and the 2009 Glenn E. & Barbara Hodson Ullyot Scholar of the Chemical Heritage Foundation—and learned of her intention to write a book recounting the life stories of the first African American women chemists. Whenever I would see her at American Chemical Society meetings, she would mention this work and I would nod and smile.

Now I worry that while I tried to look encouraging, my skepticism about her ability to complete such a book poked through. I was skeptical not only because of the small number of African American women chemistry pioneers, but also because I doubted that their lives were sufficiently documented to support a book. I could name a few African American men who had earned Ph.D.s in chemistry and had careers of distinction before affirmative action—Percy Julian, Lloyd Ferguson, and Samuel Massie, for instance—but I couldn’t name any black women in chemistry from that time, distinguished or otherwise. As I smiled I was thinking, “A whole book on this topic is impossible. What source material can there be?”

The last time I saw Brown, she was clearly dealing with health challenges and using a scooter to get around at the ACS meeting. I was more convinced her book would remain unwritten. I should have known better, though. How could writing a book about African American women chemists be more impossible than the accomplishments that the book recounts? I should have realized that Brown’s determination to write the book taps the same well that helped drive her subjects to pursue success in science.

Keep reading: Chemical & Engineering News, April 2, 2012

(via vcuafam)

— 2 months ago with 249 notes
Neil deGrasse Tyson's Mom Explains How to Raise a Brilliant Child →

wrcsolace:

Fav Black momma thing from the article:

“All three of my children are brown, and they stay brown all year round, and they even get darker in the summertime.”

— 3 months ago with 311 notes